Recent studies suggest that the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the relation of NSAID use over a 10-year period and the risk for incident AD using a nested case-control design in the population-based Rotterdam Study. The study was performed in 306 subjects; 74 Alzheimer patients diagnosed according to NINCDS-ADRDRA criteria and 232 age and sex-matched controls. NSAID use was abstracted from general practitioners' medical records and expressed as cumulative prescription days. The relative risk for AD associated with long-term use (≥2 months) was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.46-1.99) as compared to nonusers, after controlling for possible confounders. In a separate examination, subjects who had more than 6 months of prescription days had a reduced relative risk for AD (RR = 0.74 (95% CI: 0.20-2.72). In an age-stratified analysis the effect in long-term users was evident in those aged 85 and under; 0.53 (95% CI: 0.15-1.77). All risk estimates were lower when the last 2 years of exposure were excluded from the analyses. Our point estimates in subjects younger than 85 years and in subjects using NSAIDs for 6 months or more are consistent with the hypothesis that long-term use of NSAIDs reduces the risk for AD. However, overall there was no association between NSAID use and the risk for incident AD. Copyright (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Inc.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Alzheimer's disease, Nested case-control study, NSAIDs
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0197-4580(98)00096-7, hdl.handle.net/1765/66476
Journal Neurobiology of Aging: age-related phenomena, neurodegeneration and neuropathology
Citation
in 't Veld, B.A, Launer, L.J, Hoes, A.W, Ott, A, Hofman, A, Breteler, M.M.B, & Stricker, B.H.Ch. (1998). NSAIDs and incident Alzheimer's disease. The Rotterdam study. Neurobiology of Aging: age-related phenomena, neurodegeneration and neuropathology, 19(6), 607–611. doi:10.1016/S0197-4580(98)00096-7