Young male soccer players have been identified as a target group for injury prevention, but studies addressing trends and determinants of injuries within this group are scarce. The goal of this study was to analyze age-specific trends in hospital-treated upper extremity fractures (UEF) among boys playing soccer in the Netherlands and to explore associated soccer-related factors. Data were obtained from a national database for the period 1998-2009. Rates were expressed as the annual number of UEF per 1000 soccer players. Poisson's regression was used to explore the association of UEF with the number of artificial turf fields and the number of injuries by physical contact. UEF rates increased significantly by 19.4% in boys 5-10years, 73.2% in boys 11-14years, and 38.8% in boys 15-18years old. The number of injuries by physical contact showed a significant univariate association with UEF in boys 15-18years old. The number of artificial turf fields showed a significant univariate association with UEF in all age groups, and remained significant for boys aged 15-18years in a multivariate model. This study showed an increase of UEF rates in boys playing soccer, and an independent association between artificial turf fields and UEF in the oldest boys.

Childhood, Fractures, Soccer, Trend, Upper extremity
dx.doi.org/10.1111/sms.12287, hdl.handle.net/1765/66954
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

de Putter, C.E, van Beeck, E.F, Burdorf, A, Borsboom, G.J.J.M, Toet, H, Hovius, S.E.R, & Selles, R.W. (2014). Increase in upper extremity fractures in young male soccer players in the Netherlands, 1998-2009. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports. doi:10.1111/sms.12287