Background: With the increasing number of immigrants worldwide, it is essential to have insight into the factors associated with internalizing problems in immigrant youth. However, little research on this subject has been conducted. The aim of the current study is to contribute to the knowledge in this field. Methods: Data were obtained from the general population of 11- to 18-year-old Moroccan immigrant adolescents in the Netherlands. Using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Youth Self-Report (YSR), and Teacher's Report Form (TRF), 415 parent, 376 self-, and 238 teacher reports were available for analysis. Results: The data showed relations between internalizing problems and several child (externalizing and chronic health problems), proximal family (paternal and maternal support and parent-child conflict), contextual family (conflicts between parents about parenting and total number of life-events), school/peer (being bored), and migration variables (adolescent's perceived discrimination). Moreover, a modest relation was found between internalizing problems and parental psychopathology. Few associations occurred with the global family factor (e.g., family educational level). Several relations between the predictors and YSR internalizing proved to be gender-specific. Conclusions: Our results suggested that the child, school/peer, and proximal family factors are the most important in predicting the development of internalizing problems in Moroccan immigrant adolescents. The impact of the migration factor was small.

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doi.org/10.1007/s00127-005-0988-9, hdl.handle.net/1765/68022
Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology: the international journal for research in social and genetic epidemiology and mental health services
Pediatric Psychiatry

Stevens, G, Vollebergh, W.A.M, Pels, T.V.M, & Crijnen, A.A.M. (2005). Predicting internalizing problems in Moroccan immigrant adolescents in the Netherlands. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology: the international journal for research in social and genetic epidemiology and mental health services, 40(12), 1003–1011. doi:10.1007/s00127-005-0988-9