It is hypothesized that the following periconceptional and early pregnancy nutrient-gene interactions link vascular-related reproductive complications and cardiovascular diseases in adulthood: (1) Maternal and paternal genetically controlled nutrient status affects the quality of gametes and fertilization capacity; (2) The embryonic genetic constitution, derived from both parents, and the maternal genetically controlled nutrient environment determine embryogenesis and fetal growth; (3) Trophoblast invasion of decidua and spiral arteries is driven by genes derived from both parents as well as by maternal nutritional factors; (4) Angiogenesis, vasculogenesis and vascular function are dependent on the genetic constitution of the embryo, derived from both parents, and the maternal genetically controlled nutritional environment. Early intra-uterine programming of vessels may concern the same (in)dependent determinants of vascular-related complications during pregnancy and cardiovascular diseases in later life.

Congenital malformations, Embryogenesis, Placental development, Preeclampsia
dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0301-2115(02)00358-5, hdl.handle.net/1765/68115
European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Department of Gynaecology & Obstetrics

Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M, & Steegers, E.A.P. (2003). Nutrient-gene interactions in early pregnancy: A vascular hypothesis. European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology (Vol. 106, pp. 115–117). doi:10.1016/S0301-2115(02)00358-5