Purpose: A disputed social status among peers puts children and adolescents at risk for developing a wide range of problems, such as being bullied. However, there is a lack of knowledge about which early predictors could be used to identify (young) adolescents at risk for a disputed social status. The aim of this study was to assess whether preventive child health care (PCH) findings on early childhood predict neglected and rejected status in early adolescence in a large longitudinal community-based sample. Methods: Data came from 898 participants who participated in TRAILS, a longitudinal study. Information on early childhood factors was extracted from the charts of routine PCH visits registered between infancy and age of 4 years. To assess social status, peer nominations were used at age of 10-12 years. Results: Multinomial logistic regression showed that children who had a low birth weight, motor problems, and sleep problems; children of parents with a low educational level (odds ratios [ORs] between 1.71 and 2.90); and those with fewer attention hyperactivity problems (ORs =.43) were more likely to have a neglected status in early adolescence. Boys, children of parents with a low educational level, and children with early externalizing problems were more likely to have a rejected status in early adolescence (ORs between 1.69 and 2.56). Conclusions: PCH findings on early childhood - on motor and social development - are predictive of a neglected and a rejected status in early adolescence. PCH is a good setting to monitor risk factors that predict the social status of young adolescents.

Community pediatrics, Early adolescence, Long-term follow-up, Preventive health care visits, Screening early childhood
dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.03.017, hdl.handle.net/1765/68450
Journal of Adolescent Health
Pediatric Psychiatry

Jaspers, M, de Winter, A.F, Veenstra, R, Ormel, J, Verhulst, F.C, & Reijneveld, S.A. (2012). Preventive child health care findings on early childhood predict peer-group social status in early adolescence. Journal of Adolescent Health, 51(6), 637–642. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2012.03.017