Background: We recently demonstrated the feasibility of computer controlled infusion of vasoactive drugs for the control of systemic hypertension during cardiac surgery. The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of computer controlled blood pressures on hemodynamic stability when compared to conventional manual control. Method: Systemic artery blood pressures were managed either by computer (80 patients) or by a well-trained anesthesiologist (80 patients). The vasodilator drugs sodium nitroprusside and nitroglycerin were used. Hemodynamic stability was determined from the standard deviation of the mean arterial pressure samples and from the percentages of time that arterial pressure was hypertensive or hypotensive. Results: The average standard deviation of the mean arterial pressure samples was smaller for the computer controlled than for the manually controlled group: 7.5±2.2 (mean±SD) versus 8.9±2.3 mmHg (P<0.0001). The systemic artery pressure was less hypertensive and less hypotensive in the computer controlled than in the manually controlled group: 9.4±5.7 versus 13.1±6.0% (P<0.0001) and 8.0±5.9 versus 11.8±7.4% (P<0.0001), respectively. Conclusion: We conclude that, compared with manual control, computer control of systemic hypertension significantly improved hemodynamic stability during cardiac surgery.

Cardiac surgery, Closed-loop control, Hypertension
dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1399-6576.2001.045005553.x, hdl.handle.net/1765/69396
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica: an international journal of anaesthesiology and intensive care, pain and emergency medicine
Department of Pulmonology

Hoeksel, S.A.A.P, Blom, J.A, Jansen, J.R.C, Maessen, J.G, & Schreuder, J.J. (2001). Computer control versus manual control of systemic hypertension during cardiac surgery. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica: an international journal of anaesthesiology and intensive care, pain and emergency medicine, 45(5), 553–557. doi:10.1034/j.1399-6576.2001.045005553.x