Finite element modeling is an engineering tool for structural analysis that has been used for many years to assess the relationship between load transfer and bone morphology and to optimize the design and fixation of orthopedic implants. Due to recent developments in finite element model generation, for example, improved computed tomography imaging quality, improved segmentation algorithms, and faster computers, the accuracy of finite element modeling has increased vastly and finite element models simulating the anatomy and properties of an individual patient can be constructed. Such so-called patient-specific finite element models are potentially valuable tools for orthopedic surgeons in fracture risk assessment or pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement. The aim of this article is to provide a critical overview of current themes in patient-specific finite element modeling of bones. In addition, the state-of-the-art in patientspecific modeling of bones is compared with the requirements for a clinically applicable patient-specific finite element method, and judgment is passed on the feasibility of application of patient-specific finite element modeling as a part of clinical orthopedic routine. It is concluded that further development in certain aspects of patient-specific finite element modeling are needed before finite element modeling can be used as a routine clinical tool.

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doi.org/10.1177/0954411912467884, hdl.handle.net/1765/69435
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine
Department of Orthopaedics

Poelert, S, Valstar, E.R, Weinans, H.H, & Zadpoor, A.A. (2013). Patient-specific finite element modeling of bones. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine (Vol. 227, pp. 464–478). doi:10.1177/0954411912467884