The history of coronaviruses started in the 1930s when avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was first described as the causative agent of infectious bronchitis in poultry flocks (1-2). In the mid-1960s, two human coronaviruses, 229E (HCoV- 229E) and OC-43 (HCoV-OC43), were identified as pathogens for common-colds in humans (3-5). Early studies on human coronaviruses were primarily focused on the epidemiology of these viruses using serological techniques. Coronaviruses were demonstrated to contribute to as much as 35% of respiratory infections in humans during epidemics (6). In 1975, the Coronaviridae family with one genus, coronavirus, was officially established, referring to the crown-like appearance of spikes on the surface of these viruses (7).

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Keywords Huh-7 cell, HCoV-EMC, SARS-CoV S1-Fc proteins, affinity-isolated proteins, electrophoresis, non-reducing conditions
Persistent URL hdl.handle.net/1765/79789
Grant This work was funded by the European Commission 7th Framework Programme; grant id fp7/223498 - European management platform for emerging and re-emerging infectious disease entities (EMPERIE), This work was funded by the European Commission 7th Framework Programme; grant id fp7/278976 - ANTIcipating the Global Onset of Novel Epidemics (ANTIGONE)
Citation
Mou, H. (2015). Coronavirus spike-receptor interactions. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1765/79789