OBJECTIVE: Although the Polypill concept (proposed in 2003) is promising in terms of benefits for cardiovascular risk management, the potential costs and adverse effects are its main pitfalls. The objective of this study was to identify a tastier and safer alternative to the Polypill: the Polymeal. METHODS: Data on the ingredients of the Polymeal were taken from the literature. The evidence based recipe included wine, fish, dark chocolate, fruits, vegetables, garlic, and almonds. Data from the Framingham heart study and the Framingham offspring study were used to build life tables to model the benefits of the Polymeal in the general population from age 50, assuming multiplicative correlations. RESULTS: Combining the ingredients of the Polymeal would reduce cardiovascular disease events by 76%. For men, taking the Polymeal daily represented an increase in total life expectancy of 6.6 years, an increase in life expectancy free from cardiovascular disease of 9.0 years, and a decrease in life expectancy with cardiovascular disease of 2.4 years. The corresponding differences for women were 4.8, 8.1, and 3.3 years. CONCLUSION: The Polymeal promises to be an effective, non-pharmacological, safe, cheap, and tasty alternative to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and increase life expectancy in the general population.

Additional Metadata
Keywords *Diet/economics, Cacao, Cardiovascular Diseases/economics/*prevention & control, Costs and Cost Analysis, Drug Combinations, Female, Fish Products, Follow-Up Studies, Fruit, Humans, Life Expectancy, Male, Middle Aged, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Vegetables, Wine
Persistent URL hdl.handle.net/1765/8269
Journal BMJ British medical journal
Citation
Franco, O.H, Bonneux, L.G.A, de Laet, C.E.D, Peeters, A, Steyerberg, E.W, & Mackenbach, J.P. (2004). The Polymeal: a more natural, safer, and probably tastier (than the Polypill) strategy to reduce cardiovascular disease by more than 75%. BMJ British medical journal. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1765/8269