Background: Epidemiological and objective studies report an association between sedentary time and lower risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its risk factors in young and middle-age adults. To date, there is a lack of objective data on the association between sedentary time and MetS among older adults. Methods: The association between objectively measured sedentary time (accelerometry) with MetS and MetS components was examined in a large sample of older adults with mobility limitations (N=1198; mean age=78.7. ±5.3years) enrolled in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study. Participants were divided into tertiles according to percentage of daily sedentary time, and the relation between sedentary time with MetS and MetS components was examined after adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, and BMI. Results: Participants in the highest sedentary time tertile had significantly higher odds of MetS (OR=1.54) (95% CI 1.13 to 2.11) in comparison with participants in the lowest tertile (p=0.03). Participants in the highest sedentary time tertile had larger waist circumference (p=0.0001) and lower HDL-C (p=0.0003) than participants in the lowest sedentary time tertile. Conclusions: Sedentary time was strongly related to higher odds of MetS. These results, based on objectively measured sedentary time, suggest that sedentary time may represent an important risk factor for the development of MetS in older adults with high likelihood for disability.

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doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2015.06.018, hdl.handle.net/1765/84631
Experimental Gerontology
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine

Mankowski, R.T, Aubertin-Leheudre, M, Beavers, D.P, Botoseneanu, A, Buford, T.W, Church, T, … Anton, S.D. (2015). Sedentary time is associated with the metabolic syndrome in older adults with mobility limitations - The LIFE Study. Experimental Gerontology, 70, 32–36. doi:10.1016/j.exger.2015.06.018