Coronaviruses (CoVs) able to infect humans emerge through cross-host transmission from animals. There is substantial evidence that the recent Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV outbreak is fueled by zoonotic transmission from dromedary camels. This is largely based on the fact that closely related viruses have been isolated from this but not any other animal species. Given the widespread geographical distribution of dromedaries found seropositive for MERS-CoV, continued transmission may likely occur in the future. Therefore, a further understanding of the cross host transmission of MERS-CoV is needed to limit the risks this virus poses to man.

dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.coviro.2016.01.004, hdl.handle.net/1765/85976
Current Opinion in Virology
This work was funded by the European Commission 7th Framework Programme; grant id fp7/278976 - ANTIcipating the Global Onset of Novel Epidemics (ANTIGONE), This work was funded by the European Commission 7th Framework Programme; grant id h2020/643476 - COllaborative Management Platform for detection and Analyses of (Re-)emerging and foodborne outbreaks in Europe (COMPARE)
Department of Virology

Reusken, C.B.E.M, Raj, V.S, Koopmans, M.P.G, D.V.M., & Haagmans, B.L. (2016). Cross host transmission in the emergence of MERS coronavirus. Current Opinion in Virology, 16, 55–62. doi:10.1016/j.coviro.2016.01.004