Objective The associations of maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy with offspring growth patterns and body fat and insulin levels at school age were examined. Methods In a population-based birth cohort among 7,857 mothers and their children, maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy was assessed by questionnaires. Growth characteristics were measured from birth onward. At 6 years, body fat and insulin levels were measured. Results Compared to children whose mothers consumed <2 units of caffeine per day during pregnancy (1 unit of caffeine is equivalent to 1 cup of coffee (90 mg caffeine)), those whose mothers consumed ≥6 units of caffeine per day tended to have a lower weight at birth, higher weight gain from birth to 6 years, and higher body mass index from 6 months to 6 years. Both children whose mothers consumed 4-5.9 and ≥6 units of caffeine per day during pregnancy tended to have a higher childhood body mass index and total body fat mass. Only children whose mothers consumed ≥6 units of caffeine per day had a higher android/gynoid fat mass ratio. Conclusions These results suggest that high levels of maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy are associated with adverse offspring growth patterns and childhood body fat distribution.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.21466, hdl.handle.net/1765/86446
Journal Obesity: a research journal
Citation
Voerman, E, Jaddoe, V.W.V, Gishti, O, Hofman, A, Franco, O.H, & Gaillard, R. (2016). Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy, early growth, and body fat distribution at school age. Obesity: a research journal, 24(5), 1170–1177. doi:10.1002/oby.21466