Objective The associations of maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy with offspring growth patterns and body fat and insulin levels at school age were examined. Methods In a population-based birth cohort among 7,857 mothers and their children, maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy was assessed by questionnaires. Growth characteristics were measured from birth onward. At 6 years, body fat and insulin levels were measured. Results Compared to children whose mothers consumed <2 units of caffeine per day during pregnancy (1 unit of caffeine is equivalent to 1 cup of coffee (90 mg caffeine)), those whose mothers consumed ≥6 units of caffeine per day tended to have a lower weight at birth, higher weight gain from birth to 6 years, and higher body mass index from 6 months to 6 years. Both children whose mothers consumed 4-5.9 and ≥6 units of caffeine per day during pregnancy tended to have a higher childhood body mass index and total body fat mass. Only children whose mothers consumed ≥6 units of caffeine per day had a higher android/gynoid fat mass ratio. Conclusions These results suggest that high levels of maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy are associated with adverse offspring growth patterns and childhood body fat distribution.

dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.21466, hdl.handle.net/1765/86446
Obesity: a research journal
Department of Pediatrics

Voerman, E, Jaddoe, V.W.V, Gishti, O, Hofman, A, Franco, O.H, & Gaillard, R. (2016). Maternal caffeine intake during pregnancy, early growth, and body fat distribution at school age. Obesity: a research journal, 24(5), 1170–1177. doi:10.1002/oby.21466