Background: Subjective health status is an increasingly important parameter to assess the effect of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in clinical practice.Aim of this study was to determine medical and psychosocial predictors of poor subjective health status over a 10 years' post-PCI period. Methods: We included a series of consecutive PCI patients (n = 573) as part of the RESEARCH registry, a Dutch single-center retrospective cohort study. Results: These patients completed the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) at baseline and 10 years post-PCI. We found 6 predictors of poor subjective health status 10 years post-PCI: SF-36 at baseline, age, previous PCI, obesity, acute myocardial infarction as indication for PCI, and diabetes mellitus (arranged from most to least numbers of sub domains). Conclusions: SF-36 scores at baseline, age, and previous PCI were significant predictors of subjective health status 10 years post-PCI. Specifically, the SF-36 score at baseline was an important predictor. Thus assessment of subjective health status at baseline is useful as an indicator to predict long-term subjective health status. Subjective health status becomes better by optimal medical treatment, cardiac rehabilitation and psychosocial support. This is the first study determining predictors of subjective health status 10 years post-PCI.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Health surveys, Percutaneous coronary intervention, Risk factors, Subjective health status
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcha.2016.03.011, hdl.handle.net/1765/89833
Journal IJC Heart and Vasculature
Citation
van den Berge, J.C, Dulfer, K, Utens, E.M.W.J, Hartman, E.M.J, Daemen, J, van Geuns, R.J.M, & van Domburg, R.T. (2016). Predictors of subjective health status 10 years post-PCI. IJC Heart and Vasculature, 11, 19–23. doi:10.1016/j.ijcha.2016.03.011