Various studies report that cultural journalism increasingly focuses on service and entertainment instead of serious arts coverage. The press prioritizes popular culture over traditional high arts to growing extent. However, this shift in journalistic attention doesn’t necessarily signify a straightforward decline in aesthetic standards, as popular cultural forms like film have developed along the lines of high art principles in the past decades.
This article charts trends in American, Dutch, French, and German film journalism between 1955 and 2005. It demonstrates that coverage is typified by a serious aesthetic approach from the 1970s onwards. The principles of art are seen to steer journalists’ attention to an important degree: the review remains the predominant journalistic genre, and newspapers devote more attention to films by prestigious directors than strictly commercial moviemakers.
As such, film’s prominence in the press doesn’t seem to indicate a decline in serious cultural journalism but rather a revaluation of a popular cultural form.

Additional Metadata
Keywords arts coverage, commercialization, cultural journalism, film journalism, popular culture, reviews
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2016.1205955, hdl.handle.net/1765/93131
Journal Journalism Practice
Citation
Kersten, A, & Janssen, M.S.S.E. (2016). Trends in Cultural Journalism. Journalism Practice, : "Online first", 1–21. doi:10.1080/17512786.2016.1205955