To describe the key diagnostic features of pediatric Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) and validate the Brighton criteria. Retrospective cohort study of all children (<18 years) diagnosed with GBS between 1987 and 2013 at Sophia Children’s Hospital, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam. Clinical information was collected and the sensitivity of the Brighton criteria was calculated. 67 children (35 boys) were included, with a median age of 5.0 years [interquartile range (IQR) 3.0–10.0 years]. Bilateral limb weakness was present at hospital admission in 93% of children, and at nadir in all patients. Children presented with tetraparesis in 70% or with paraparesis in 23%. Reduced reflexes in paretic limbs were observed at hospital admission in 82% and during follow-up in all children. The progressive phase lasted median 6 days (IQR 3–8 days) and less than 4 weeks in all children. A monophasic disease course was seen in 97%, including 5 children with a treatment-related fluctuation. Two children had a later relapse at 9 weeks and 19 weeks after onset. 77% of the children showed an elevated protein level in CSF. Nerve conduction studies showed evidence for a poly(radiculo)neuropathy in 91% of the children. 46 children had a complete data set, the sensitivity of the Brighton criteria level 1 was 72% (95% CI 57–84) and 96% (95% CI 85–99) for level 2 and 98% (95% CI 88–100) for level 3. The majority of the pediatric GBS patients presented in this cohort fulfilled the current diagnostic criteria.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Brighton criteria, Cerebrospinal fluid, Guillain–Barré syndrome, Nerve conduction study, Pediatrics
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-017-8429-8, hdl.handle.net/1765/98280
Journal Journal of Neurology: official journal of the European Neurological Society
Citation
Roodbol, J, de Wit, M.C.Y, van den Berg, B, Kahlmann, V. (Vivienne), Drenthen, J, Catsman-Berrevoets, C.E, & Jacobs, B.C. (2017). Diagnosis of Guillain–Barré syndrome in children and validation of the Brighton criteria. Journal of Neurology: official journal of the European Neurological Society, 264(5), 856–861. doi:10.1007/s00415-017-8429-8