Objective: This study examines the differences in bone mineral density between normal-weight children and children with overweight or obesity.
Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies (published up to 22 June 2016) on the differences in bone mineral density between normal-weight children and overweight and obese children was performed. Results were pooled when possible and mean differences (MDs) were calculated between normal-weight and overweight and normal-weight and obese children for bone content and density measures at different body sites.
Results: Twenty-seven studies, with a total of 5,958 children, were included. There was moderate and high quality of evidence that overweight (MD 213 g; 95% confidence interval [CI] 166, 261) and obese children (MD 329 g; 95%CI [229, 430]) have a significantly higher whole body bone mineral content than normal-weight children. Similar results were found for whole body bone mineral density. Sensitivity analysis showed that the association was stronger in girls.
Conclusions: Overweight and obese children have a significantly higher bone mineral density compared with normal-weight children. Because there was only one study included with a longitudinal design, the long-term impact of childhood overweight and obesity on bone health at adulthood is not clear.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Bone mineral density, Children, Obesity, Overweight
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1111/obr.12515, hdl.handle.net/1765/98559
Journal Obesity Reviews
Citation
van Leeuwen, J.J, Koes, B.W, Paulis, W.D, & van Middelkoop, M. (2017). Differences in bone mineral density between normal-weight children and children with overweight and obesity: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews (Vol. 18, pp. 526–546). doi:10.1111/obr.12515