The parent-child attachment relationship plays an important role in the development of the infant's stress regulation system. However, genetic and epigenetic factors such as FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP5) genotype and DNA methylation have also been associated with hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning. In the current study, we examined how parent-child dyadic regulation works in concert with genetic and epigenetic aspects of stress regulation. We study the associations of attachment, extreme maternal insensitivity, FKBP5 single nucleotide polymorphism 1360780, and FKBP5 methylation, with cortisol reactivity to the Strange Situation Procedure in 298 14-month-old infants. The results indicate that FKBP5 methylation moderates the associations of FKBP5 genotype and resistant attachment with cortisol reactivity. We conclude that the inclusion of epigenetics in the field of developmental psychopathology may lead to a more precise picture of the interplay between genetic makeup and parenting in shaping stress reactivity.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1017/S095457941700013X, hdl.handle.net/1765/99288
Journal Development and Psychopathology
Citation
Mulder, R.H. (Rosa H.), Rijlaarsdam, J, Luijk, P.C.M, Verhulst, F.C, Felix, J.F, Tiemeier, H.W, … van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2017). Methylation matters: FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP5) methylation moderates the associations of FKBP5 genotype and resistant attachment with stress regulation. Development and Psychopathology, 29(2), 491–503. doi:10.1017/S095457941700013X