A historic turn in organization studies requires a basic theoretical understanding of ‘doing history’ and an appreciation of the centrality of narrative in history. Following the cultural turn in history, narrativist historians and philosophers of history such as Hayden White, Frank Ankersmit and Paul Ricoeur have made the case that narrative is an essential and unavoidable component in history. We demonstrate the persuasive capacity of narrative through a narrativist critique of three bestselling ‘management gurus’. This analysis illustrates the following: (1) the narrative features of popular organizational theories; (2) the basis of the success of guru literature; and (3) why gurus and organizational scientists themselves do not understand the narratological mechanisms behind their success. Finally, we maintain that historical narrativism offers the possibility for positioning organizational history as a highly relevant field for management academics, gurus and even managers, providing support for a historic turn.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1177/1744935912438311, hdl.handle.net/1765/110042
Journal Management and Organizational History
Citation
Keulen, S.J, & Kroeze, D.B.R. (2018). Understanding Management Gurus and Historical Narratives: the benefits of a historic turn in management and organization studies. Management and Organizational History, 7(2), 171–189. doi:10.1177/1744935912438311