Aims: Many people with a long-standing spinal cord injury have an inactive lifestyle. Although exercise self-efficacy is considered a key determinant of engaging in exercise, the relationship between exercise self-efficacy and physical activity remains unclear. Therefore, this study examines the relationship between exercise self-efficacy and the amount of physical activity in persons with long-standing spinal cord injury. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 268 individuals (aged 28–65 years) with spinal cord injury 10 years and using a wheelchair. Physical activity was measured with the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals with Physical Disabilities. Exercise self-efficacy was assessed with the Spinal cord injury Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale. Univariate and multivariable regression analyses were performed to test for the association between exercise self-efficacy and physical activity, controlling for supposed confounders. Results: Univariate regression analysis revealed that exercise self-efficacy was significantly related to the level of daily physical activity (b ¼ 0.05; 95% CI 0.04–0.07; 15% explained variance; p < 0.001). In multivariable regression analysis exercise self-efficacy remained, explaining a significant additional amount of the variance (2%; p < 0.001) of physical activity. Conclusion: Exercise-self efficacy is a weak but independent explanatory factor of the level of physical activity among persons with long-standing spinal cord injury. Longitudinal trials are needed to study the impact of interventions targeting an increase of exercise self-efficacy on the amount of physical activity performed.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Spinal cord injury, physical activity, self-efficacy, exercise, behavioural model
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2019.1574914, hdl.handle.net/1765/116204
Journal Disability and Rehabilitation
Citation
Kooijmans, H., Verhoef-Post, M, Motazedi, E., Spijkerman, D., Bongers-Janssen, H., Stam, H.J, & Bussman, H. (2019). Exercise self-efficacy is weakly related to engagement in physical activity in persons with long-standing spinal cord injury. Disability and Rehabilitation. doi:10.1080/09638288.2019.1574914